Dmitry Samarov

The mission of the O’Connor Art Gallery is to present timely, relevant and focused contemporary art exhibitions that foster critical and thoughtful dialogue across disciplines. Exhibitions are curated with the Dominican student body in mind, as they are meant to introduce students to new and innovative artistic concepts, practices and strategies.

Located in Lewis Hall, steps from many of the art department’s studios and classrooms, the gallery is particularly accessible to art students as a space for intimate engagement and reflection. In addition to at least three curated exhibitions per year, the gallery is the site of an annual juried student show and senior thesis exhibitions.

The gallery is open to the public during the academic year.

Questions? Contact Karen Azarnia, Gallery Director

Gallery Hours

Monday–Friday, 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Current Exhibition

Dmitry Samarov, Paintings and Drawings
September 5–October 17, 2018
Opening Reception, September 5, 4:00–7:00 p.m., with an artist talk at 3:30 p.m.

For more than thirty years, much of Dmitry Samarov's work has been focused on watching what goes on outside of himself. With their dynamic perspectives and rough, unresolved-look, his paintings and drawings could never be mistaken for photographs but resemble the seen world nonetheless. Whether it is a picture of his living room, a cluttered bookshelf, friends and family members, or the view outside his window, Samarov trusts what he sees and makes marks that correspond and echo what passes in front of his eyes. This exhibition will present a survey of his work completed within the past twenty years.

Coming Up

Story Space: Retracing and Retelling in the Narrative Landscape

Jane Fulton Alt, Anna Eveslage, Tomiko Jones and Colin Stearns
November 7–December 21, 2018
Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 7, 4:00–7:00 p.m., Gallery talk at 4:00 p.m.
Image: Rattlesnake Lake, 2014, Tomiko Jones

Curated by Javier Carmona, Dominican University Professor of Photo-Cinema

This exhibition highlights the photographic work of four artists using the landscape as a staging ground for existing and constructed narrative. Images explore personal biography, environmental impact and national history.

About the Artists

Jane Fulton Alt began exploring the visual arts while pursuing her career as a clinical social worker. She received her BA from the University of Michigan and her MA from the University of Chicago. She is living and working on the shores of Lake Michigan in Evanston, Illinois, and in close proximity to the Mississippi River in New Orleans. Alt is a three time winner of Photolucida’s Critical Mass for her Katrina and Burn portfolios. She has authored Look and Leave: Photographs and Stories of New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward, The Burn, and her Crude Awakening portfolio was printed in multiple publications worldwide. Alt has exhibited nationally and internationally and her work can be found in many permanent collections. 

Anna Eveslage is a photographer and writer, currently living and working in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She uses images and words together to tell stories about people, both through static and time-based works. While her stories are fictional, they focus on the shared emotional truth of what it means to be human. With a working style that is centered on attention to detail and meticulous planning, her work lives in the place where fiction and theater intersect with photography.

Tomiko Jones' work is linked to place, exploring transitions in the landscape in social, cultural and geographical terms. Jones received her Master of Fine Arts in Photography with a Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Recent projects include Hatsubon, a two-volume project in photography and video installation; and the long-term project Rattlesnake Lake. Tomiko spent three months in residence at Museé Niépce in Chalon-Sur-Saône, France, and in Cassis, France for a project-specific Fellowship at The Camargo Foundation.

Colin Stearns uses photography and the photobook as his primary modes of making. He is motivated by the non-linear narrative possibilities of the photobook and remains deeply inspired by the photograph as a signifier of history, physical object and metaphor. He pushes photographs to live in disconnected isolation or be the means of connection to other ideas and physical manifestations. Historical and cultural markers, combined with the structures of narrative fiction, instigate his practice. His reoccurring process is an autobiographical approach to personal space distilled by cultural history.