Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Download a printable program (pdf)

*Online registration is now closed. Walk-ins are welcome for the Opening Plenary and Concurrent Sessions only (lunch seatings are full and no longer taking RSVPs). If registering as a walk-in, please check in at the Registration Table in the Slate Lobby of the Fine Arts Building before proceeding to the Opening Plenary or sessions.

The 2018 Caritas Veritas Symposium considers our values of love and truth for the contemporary moment, asking: What does our Caritas Veritas motto mean to you? How does it inspire you to live our mission? How do you contribute to the legacy of the Sinsinawa Dominicans?

Opening Plenary: 9 a.m.

Lund Auditorium

Concurrent Sessions I: 10 a.m.
Parmer 107

Thomas D. Abrahamson, Mary Elizabeth (M.E.) Cleary, Hugh Toner ’79, MBA ‘87

One primary responsibility of the members of the Board of Trustees is to assure the continuing harmony between the mission of the Sinsinawa Dominicans and the mission of the University. This panel of trustees will speak about how the values of caritas and veritas guide their decision-making, and reflect on their understanding of the Board’s role in honoring the legacy of the Sinsinawa Dominicans.

Noonan Reading Room (Lewis Hall, 2nd floor adjacent to Rosary Chapel)

Jeffrey Carlson, Lisa Petrov, Chavella Pittman, Sheila Radford-Hill

This summer a team of DU faculty and staff attended the Diversity, Civility and the Liberal Arts Institute in Atlanta, GA. This session will share a summary of what our team learned at the institute and provide some tentative ideas of how DU might apply that knowledge to empower our students, especially to help them understand how their cultural strengths can enhance their efforts to complete college with a purpose.

Springer Suites (Lower Level Crown Library, near Cyber Café)

Joyce Shim

North Korea is always viewed as an international threat. In the meantime, the urgent issue of its refugees is not addressed as much. This presentation provides an overview of the current status of the North Korean refugees and discusses how the issue of refugees has been constructed as a social problem and approached in different ways by the South Korean society.

Hugh McElwain

On the occasion of the 70th Anniversary of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (12/10/2018), and given the obvious inequality/inequity in contemporary society, it seemed appropriate to ask what the Dominican University core values might have to say about such inequity—even to its deepest level of poverty itself.

Lewis 204

Dianne Costanzo

Ultimately, we all wish to be free, but many of us think “freedom” is the ability to do whatever we wish to do; we often mistake license for real freedom.  In this presentation, we shall explore through poetry, philosophy, and spirituality some things to consider as we try to negotiate our life journey.  We may come to find that a strong liberal arts education is exactly what we need to help us discern our deepest desires, place us in the “ongoing conversation” of great minds, and give us hope in a world that sometimes seems hopeless.

Judy Paulus

In the field of disability support services, equal does not mean same and that “doing the right thing” means removing barriers and assumptions that continue to keep individuals with disabilities at an economic and social disadvantage. The authors of Disability: A Diversity Model Approach in Human Service Practice, state; “though many laws and initiatives have been passed and declarations made, disabled people throughout the world still experience discrimination, poverty, and lack of access to societal resources. Though important, and maybe even necessary, it is not sufficient to pass disability laws and initiatives; the civil rights of disabled persons must be achieved.”  This presentation will explore the claim that “socially just societies can be measured to the extent to which laws and practices ensure universal rights for all their members, disabled and nondisabled, minority or majority.”

Bluhm Lecture Hall (Parmer 108)

Yasemin Ersun-Hallsby, Kassey Franco, William George, Rachel Hart Winter, Patrick Homan

In his encyclical, Pope Francis shows how climate change, environmental degradation, and loss of biodiversity will ultimately affect everyone but will affect people unequally. This Panel will explore the global intersections between “environment and equity” (here, environment includes "climate") through multiple lenses, especially international law and relations and the global water crisis.

Martin Recital Hall (Small Theatre, Fine Arts Building)

Jose Blanco, Emily Bochniak, Giselle Magana, Dejah Mansfield, Amanda Ruano

Does fashion reflect the motto of Caritas and Veritas? How can fashion as an industry and fashion as an academic unit contribute to Dominican University’s mission and the legacy of the Sinsinawa Dominicans? This presentation—led by faculty, Dominican University students and community partners—will address how fashion as a phenomenon and as an industry thrives on social injustice, exclusivity, and elitism while also discussing efforts within the industry seeking to ensure human dignity and social responsibility, humane and fair working conditions, fair trade, and environmental stewardship.

Lewis 302

Dane Cruz, Colette Davion, Linda Durack, Sasha Santiago, Jacqueline Williamson, Sister Felicia Wolf, OSF

Students, alumni and faculty in the CASS Master of Arts in Conflict Resolution Program describe principles and methods of mediation and conflict resolution and engage their audience in enacting mediation, conflict resolution, and Caritas and Veritas. The diverse panel of students, alumni, and faculty will draw from knowledge gained in the MCR Program and real-world, diverse work and community settings.

Parmer 113

Ben Freville, Josephine Sarvis, Penny Silvers, Debra Vinci-Minogue

Four Education faculty will engage participants in explorations of Caritas and Veritas through picture books, images, video, and poetry.  The session will culminate in sharing ideas and insights about Love and Truth, and ways to address biases and taken-for-granted assumptions to make a positive impact within our university and beyond.

Lewis 301

Sister Peggy Ryan, OP, Suhad Tabahi

Research indicates that 92 percent of people in the United States believe in God.  Why is there not more of an integration of faith in the healing process employed by social sciences today?  Can the promotion of indigenous spiritual practices benefit practice with individuals, families, and communities?  Join us in exploring what two of the world's most practiced religions - Christianity and Islam - can offer the healing process.

 

Concurrent Sessions II: 11:15 a.m.
Dining & Social Hall

Please refer to your nametag for your lunch session.

Parmer 107

Suhad Tabahi

This presentation challenges the mainstream popularized question of “why do they hate us?” and instead offers us to think about how we can make sense and understand the spread of anti-Americanism and anti- imperialism in the context of diverse and contradictory attitudes? A critical post-colonial perspective  will be presented to raise historical conciseness about histories of the colonial and imperial past as well as understand the perception of Arab agency.

Yasemin Ersun-Hallsby

My 30-minute long presentation will cover the current developments in public policy with regards to the environmental issues, and scientific developments addressing these issues. It is never too late to be vigilant about addressing the perils we are facing, and bring a basic level of understanding and ownership to the tasks at hand using the motto Caritas Veritas.

Martin Recital Hall (Small Theatre, Fine Arts Building)

Faisal Alghamdi, Juan Garcia, Warren Green, Patrick Hussey, Amy Omi, Jaqueline Romo, Jonathan Seals

Come, listen to student, staff and faculty share stories of personal and spiritual awakenings that have transformed the teller's everyday life.  Culled largely from a series of Interfaith “Coffee Houses” sponsored by University Ministry, this gathering of storytellers and listeners will draw on faith as lived experience and the encounter of the sacred in ourselves and in each other. Join us in the practice of the art of listening compassionately and the challenges of nurturing awareness of what the members of our community with diverse identities hold sacred.

Bluhm Lecture Hall (Parmer 108)

Jacob Bucher, Clinton Nichols

Fyodor Dostoyevsky famously wrote that we can judge the civilization of a society by entering its prisons – suggesting that how we treat those convicted of a crime is evidence of our values around social justice. Not only does teaching in a prison create unique and innovative learning environments, but it allows the continuation of the spirit of the Sinsinawa Sisters who believe in pursuing social justice wherever there is need – including in a prison.

Lewis 302

Kalelys L. CaleroGonzalez, Monica Halloran, Derrick Hilton, Emily Sabo

To take seriously the call of Laudato Si’ to care for our common home means that we need to see our campus and its surroundings as not only part of a community but as part of an ecosystem.  This panel will explore how a range of recent activities have helped knit together students, staff, faculty, and community members around caritas for our shared environment.

Parmer 005

Dan Beach, Tracy L. Caldwell, Bob Calin-Jageman, Sophia Duffy, Anthony Krafnick, Tina Taylor-Ritzler

For students, the value of engaging in high impact educational practices (HIPs; e.g., internships, supervised research, community-based learning, and study abroad) is the opportunity align with mission by embodying and exuding truth and love in the communities in which they serve. In this panel, faculty members and students from the Psychology Department will share their experiences wrestling with the application of caritas et veritas through engagement in HIPs.

Springer Suites (Lower Level Crown Library, near Cyber Café)

Kimberly Garrett, Ben Freville, Adrian Kok, Stacy Kowalczyk, Kate Marek, Susan McDonough, Cecilia Salvatore, and Joyce Shim

The CASS Roles and Responsibilities Task Force was formed to define and establish the roles and responsibilities of faculty in Education, Information Studies, and Social Work within the newly-formed College of Applied Social Sciences (CASS). In this panel, members of the task force describe what Caritas Veritas motto mean to them and how it inspires them when working together for a new common goal.

Lewis Lounge (Lewis Hall, 1st floor, north end of building)

Dave Aron, Anjali Chaudhry

We will collaborate with the Dominican University improv group, ‘Bob Ross' Happy Accidents’ for a workshop where participants will experience the beauty of the unexpected through improvisational comedy.  Through games and exercises, we will explore what it means to be spontaneous without the fear of hurting someone’s feelings.  We will share techniques that allow all of us to contribute in a safe and non-judgmental way. All of our contributions matter. As Del Close said, “every interpersonal situation has a solution in which everyone wins.”

Parmer 113

Phil Andrews, Bill Jenkins

It is never too early for the next generation to work for the society they want to live in.  More than a mere motto, Caritas and Veritas provides a foundation for peaceful and constructive dialog and action when it is combined with social activism and political involvement. Lessons learned from the response to the Parkland shooting and why it differed from those of Columbine and Sandy Hook will be examined and strategies for building safer and more peaceful communities will be discussed.

Lewis 301

Tanya Burgess

We will discuss how to assess and counteract cultural intolerance in the work place and how to advocate for social change with the barriers of systemic and cultural discrimination by effecting one person at a time.

Lewis 204

Peter Alonzi, Dan Condon

Is self-interested the same as selfish? Are profits all about the money? Two economists will provide you with insights that might help you discover answers you did not expect to find.

 

Concurrent Sessions III: 12:30 p.m.
Dining & Social Hall

Please refer to your nametag for your lunch session.

Bluhm Lecture Hall (Parmer 108)

Rogelia Lily Ibarra, Anthony Suarez Abraham

In this panel presentation, Professors Suárez-Abraham and Ibarra will discuss their shared scholarly and pedagogical interests and strategies on gang culture in two of their recent courses.

Parmer 113

Natasha Fields, Everett Krause, Ellen McManus, Richard Woods, OP

Laudato Si' calls for us to care for all of creation, which may require us to think in different ways about the meanings of "just" and "humane."   Panelists will discuss how Laudato Si’ and the concept of anthropocentrism help us think in broader and deeper terms about what it means to create a more just and humane world.

Lewis 301

Marcos Constantino, Claudia Guzman, Maricela Mariscal, Natalie Sanchez, Yasmin Vasquez-Moreno

This summer students from Ministry en lo Cotidiano will be presenting at a national conference, El Futuro is Here, being hosted by Dominican University. During the conference students from the internship program will host a breakout session where they will share reflections from their time in MLC. Come hear the stories they shared and how they experienced faith and service Latinamente.

Lewis 204

Emily Bochniak, Daniel Born, Mariam Gabriel

If the Coen brothers' film Fargo gave us Minnesota Nice, and if Chicago embodies a cultural style known as Midwestern Nice, Dominican University may be said to exhibit something we call Dominican Nice. By deploying cultural studies and close anthropological observation, we detail the various forms that Dominican Nice takes, and the implications of this style for a community that holds caritas and veritas at the center of its mission.

Martin Recital Hall (Small Theatre, Fine Arts Building)

David H. Krause

In this interactive presentation we will look closely at a few original photographs taken in some representative Chicago cemeteries, including Graceland, Rosehill, Calvary, Bohemian National, Waldheim, Forest Home, Oak Woods, and Mount Carmel.  Our primary purpose will be to seek some knowledge of our own buried lives, our own “unspeakable desires” about our mortality, through the lenses of caritas and veritas. 

Parmer 107

Mark Carbonara, Kate Schmidt

The legacy of Sinsinawa Dominican Sisters involves a deep investment in the holistic development of students; on campus today, mentors are some of the most influential people in students’ lives.  If you have ever wanted to be a mentor, find a mentor, or learn more about mentoring, please join and be a part of this conversation!

Springer Suites (Lower Level Crown Library, near Cyber Café)

Sara Furlette-Koski, Kate Kennealy, Courtney Klug, Martina Lowery, Sal Montes

This presentation navigates through the process of receiving an individual education plan (IEP) and how this funding crisis has adversely impacted students access to services. Our findings suggest that students with special needs in CPS are a particularly vulnerable population that deserves to have their rights and access to quality education protected.  Implications for social work practice, policy and advocacy are discussed.

 

Concurrent Sessions IV: 1:45 p.m.
Springer Suites (Lower Level Crown Library, near Cyber Café)

Julie Bach, Jacob Bucher, Ben Freville, Monica Halloran, Kate Marek, Colleen Reardon

While much value can be gained through discourse on the theoretical understanding of “Caritas and Veritas”, there is also an interesting and important discussion around applying “Caritas and Veritas” in one’s occupation. The College of Applied Social Sciences is organized around programs that help students pursue not only the study of social justice, but also prepares students to employ the aspects of our mission in their employment.

Lewis 204

Peter Alonzi, Molly Burke, Mark Carbonara, Sister Marci Hermesdorf, OP, Sister Diane Kennedy, OP, Felice Maciejewski, Nkuzi Nnam, Sister Melissa Waters, OP

WHO Sinsinawa Dominican Associates are, WHY they became Associates, WHAT Associates mean to the Sinsinawa Dominican Sisters; HOW Associates can live out our Caritas/Veritas mission and WHAT the process is for becoming an ASSOCIATE.

Parmer 113

Carlos Bautista, Sol Beltran, Zahra Domin, Bill George, Mary Sadofsky and Andrea Senyk

Perhaps the most visionary aspect of Laudato Si' is its call to think about justice in terms of the future.  This panel will explore the concepts of intergenerational justice, caritas for the future, and the ethical obligations of universities to educate students in the light of a commitment to veritas about the future.

Martin Recital Hall (Small Theatre, Fine Arts Building)

DeJada Daily, Mylisha Harvey, Anika Jones, Troy Kates, Kiasee Ray, Bianca Satterfield, Jonathan Seals, Tara Suchland, Easter Young

What role do culture and faith play in creating a more just society? This panel will reflect on their experience as the first cohort of the Beloved Community internship at Dominican University. Their insights will focus specifically on the role of black spiritual and cultural tradition in building a community rooted in love and truth.

Parmer 107

Dan Condon (moderator)

Professor Dan Condon will moderate a student panel. The theme of the panel will revolve around two central questions about the meaning of Caritas and Veritas: (1) How have you experienced Caritas and Veritas during your educational experience at Dominican?; and (2) How has that experience impacted the way you live your life?

Bluhm Lecture Hall (Parmer 108)

Amy Do, Yijun Gao, Jane Hseu, Cecilia Salvatore, Joyce Shim, Sheila Yousuf-Abramson

This roundtable of staff, faculty, and a student from different departments reflects on the experiences of Asian/Pacific Islander/Americans at Dominican University.

Noonan Reading Room (Lewis Hall, 2nd floor adjacent to Rosary Chapel)

Elizabeth Ritzman

Mindfulness that works: Learn to use very quick and effective strategies to manage your emotional state, reduce stress and advance learning even in the difficult moments of your day to day life.

 

Academic Convocation: 3:15 p.m.

Lund Auditorium