RDCU 302 Introduction to Special Education (1)

In this foundational course candidates engage in a study of the ethical framework and standards that underlie the provision of services to students with disabilities. They study the various roles that a special education teacher may take on and the responsibilities of each. Candidates consider the responsibilities of the special education teacher to collaborate with general education teachers and families. The course includes an emphasis on essential elements of instructional planning, classroom management and individualized instruction. Prerequisites: None

ECED 303 Child, Family and Community Relations (3)

The purpose of this course is to assist candidates in developing the necessary skills to work cooperatively with families and community members. This starts with the understanding that all young children are fully functioning members of a diverse and multicultural school, family, and community. In this case, candidates gain insight into family perspectives and experiences by examining the social, economic, legislative, and technological impacts on children and families, including families of children with special needs. They evaluate existing support services and service delivery models in the school and community with respect to diversity, exceptionality, and family health and well-being with a particular emphasis on strategies to promote and ensure effective communication, collaboration, and consultation between home, school, and community. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program or Education Minor

EDUC 320 Educational Psychology (3)

In this course, candidates explore the theoretical basis for teaching and learning in kindergarten through 12th grade classrooms. While the course is theoretical in nature, candidates also explore the application of theory to classroom practice. Topics addressed include theories of learning; cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development; motivation; classroom management; and individual differences and diversity in learning. A particular focus is placed on the developmental characteristics and the nature and needs of elementary, middle/early adolescent, and secondary learners. Prerequisites: SEDU 301 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program. NOTE: For students majoring in special education, EDUC 200 and 310 are not required.

EDUC 373 Methods and Materials for Teaching Reading and Writing in the Elementary Classroom (3)

Candidates focus on current research-based reading and writing instruction at the P-12 levels. Using a balanced perspective, candidates discuss theoretical models and philosophies of reading and writing instruction and their applicability in the classroom setting. Content also includes learning about phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension theories and practice. Candidates explore implementation of the Common Core State Standards using a variety of assessment and instructional practices, including reading and writing strategies (i.e. before, during, after reading both fiction and non-fiction texts), close reading of complex texts from diverse perspectives, multicultural literacy materials, use of technology as a tool for learning, and extensive reading and writing for authentic purposes across subject areas. Appropriate literacy assessments will also be included. Notes to Students: Clinically-based course taught on-site in a partner elementary school. 24 hours of fieldwork required. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

EDUC 376 Methods and Materials for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary Classroom (3)

Candidates learn to effectively teach elementary school mathematics. Drawing on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (2010), this course provides candidates with meaningful and practical learning experiences about elementary level math instruction including: teaching diverse students, enhancing school math content and pedagogical knowledge, differentiating instruction, establishing a safe and positive learning environment, employing various strategies to support student mathematical learning and thinking, developing students’ academic language, assessing students’ mathematical learning, building a collaborative relationships and being a reflective novice teacher. Notes to Students: Clinically-based course taught on-site in a partner elementary school. 24 hours of fieldwork required. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 416 Foundations of Language Minority Education (3)

This course provides an introduction to the historical, philosophical, political, social, and scientific issues that have contributed to public policy regarding educational services for English Language Learners. The candidate will begin by examining the neurolinguistic and psycholinguistic models for language acquisition, how language functions in the brain, and how the bilingual brain activates languages. Then a comprehensive focus will be placed on the different types of language education programs in the United States as well as the best research-based practices for English Language Learners in our schools. Historical trends, political policies and legal issues related to language education in the United States as well as foreign countries will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program. 

SEDU 322 Exceptional Students: Characteristics and the Special Education Process (3)

In this course, candidates study the psychology and characteristics of exceptional students from preschool through high school. They learn how to assess services for such students in a variety of school settings. Candidates consider the impact of disabilities on development, learning, and communication processes. A major portion of this course focuses on the special education process In this course, candidates study the psychology and characteristics of exceptional students from preschool through high school. They learn how to assess services for such students in a variety of school settings. Candidates consider the impact of disabilities on development, learning, and communication processes. A major portion of this course focuses on the special education process including laws, rules, regulations, and procedural safeguards as well as the development of IEPs and behavior management plans. Candidates become familiar with their role in working with exceptional students, their families, and special education service providers. Prerequisite: SEDU 302

SEDU 356 Collaboration and Adaptation in General Education Settings (3)

Candidates examine the importance and process of collaboration with family, classroom teachers, para-educators, and other school and community personnel in integrating individuals with disabilities into various social and learning environments. Candidates study the process of examining the learning environment and classroom demands with consideration of the learning characteristics of students with disabilities, for the purpose of selecting appropriate strategies and materials. Candidates demonstrate scaffolding techniques for modifying instructional methods, curricular materials and the learning environments, state and local assessments, and support of behavior management plans. Specific attention is given to effective co-teaching practices including effective communication, collaboration, co-planning and conflict resolution skills. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: SEDU 322 and Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program.

SEDU 359 Managing Challenging Behavior (3)

In this course, candidates study the use of appropriate non-aversive least intrusive management procedures when presented with a variety of behavioral problems including challenging behavior. Candidates learn strategies for individual behavior management, crisis prevention, conflict resolution, and the effective use of reinforcement. Additionally strategies and techniques to arrange and modify the learning environment to facilitate learning according to students' emotional, social, and behavioral needs are also considered. As part of this course, candidates study and complete functional assessments of behavior and develop behavior intervention plans based on student case studies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

RDCU 360 Psychoeducational Diagnosis (3)

In this course candidates engage in the diagnostic assessment process. They develop proficiency in administering individualized assessments and writing, analyzing and interpreting test results. In addition, this course includes a focus on testing accommodation and interpretation of group administered standardized tests. Key aspects of the Response to Intervention (RTI) process for identifying students with learning disabilities are addressed. Candidates gain experience in administering curriculum based measurements and monitoring progress. They read case studies and write diagnostic reports that serve as a basis for instructional planning. Candidates participate in activities to communicate diagnostic reports to teachers, paraprofessionals, parents and students themselves. Underlying all course content is an emphasis on ethical principles and legal guidelines that undergird the psychoeducational diagnostic process. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

RDCU 370 Planning and Assessment in Special Education (3)

This course addresses development of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Transition Plans for students with various disabilities across the age span of P-12 with an emphasis on the integral role of ongoing assessment in decision making and the planning process. Using case studies, candidates will write IEPs and prepare transition plans for students in special education with particular attention given to development of statements of present levels of performance, measurable annual goals and short term objectives/benchmarks, progress monitoring and reporting of progress, determination of the least restrictive environment, and access to general education and documentation of adaptations and modifications of instruction and assessment in general education settings. As part of this course, candidates will examine formative assessment including curriculum-based measurement, work sample/error analysis, classroom assessments and pre-and post- assessments for instruction. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program and SEDU 360

SEDU 372 Academic Methods for Middle and Secondary Students with Disabilities (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates to use a variety of instructional strategies and to create learning experiences that encourage middle and secondary students’ development across many skill domains. The content of this course will focus on academic methods in science, mathematics, social science and English for middle and secondary level students with disabilities with particular emphasis on content area and learning strategy instruction. Candidates are engaged in activities which promote safety practices in the science class, the 5E model, inquiry-based learning and the scientific method. In the area of social sciences, instructional resources including primary sources and technologies are explored so as to engage diverse learners in historical inquiry and analysis, exploration of ideas and perspectives that have a global impact. As an essential first step, the course addresses assessment of student skills and achievement, instructional needs, and evaluation of teaching methods and materials. With case studies as a basis, candidates write lesson plans appropriate to student needs, common core state standards and College and Career Readiness Standards. Prerequisites: SEDU 356, SEDU 359, and SEDU 374 and Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SEDU 374 Curriculum and Methods for Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (3)

In this course, candidates will study instructional techniques and specialized methods that may be aspects of instruction of students with moderate to severe disabilities. This includes coverage of the functional curriculum across a variety of domains including self -care, life skills, recreation/leisure, domestic, community and career/vocational. Specialized interventions and methodology for individuals (preschool through high school) with a focus on physical (including positioning support), communication (including augmentative communication), and other techniques and methods that support student learning and development of key functional skills also will be addressed. Candidates will examine assessment and adjustment of learning environments, planning and development of instructional programs directed toward objectives established for a variety of key skills, and provision of opportunities for student choice and development of positive self-concepts. This course also will include consideration of the importance of the use of appropriate materials emphasizing functionality, instruction in natural settings, and interactions between students with and without disabilities. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SEDU 376 Academic Methods for Early Childhood-Elementary Level Students with Disabilities (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates to use a variety of instructional strategies and create learning experiences that encourage early childhood and elementary student development across many skill domains. The content of this course will focus on academic methods in the basic areas of early childhood-elementary level students with particular emphasis on oral language, balanced approach to reading, writing, science, social science and mathematics instruction. Principles and techniques associated with effective research based principles and methods for assessment, planning and instruction will be addressed. A variety of instructional techniques across subject areas will be discussed and research in the areas of instructional strategies and delivery are examined. Candidates will demonstrate the ability to plan multi-sensory units and lessons for students at the readiness through intermediate levels based on knowledge of the discipline, student needs, and curricular and IEP goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SEDU 378 Internship and Seminar in Special Education (1)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with experience in working directly with students with disabilities. Candidates will be assigned to a setting with students with disabilities and will work with a certified special education teacher. The candidate both observes in this setting and takes an active part in the classroom activities. Through this experience candidates observe similarities and differences across various aspects of development in students with disabilities or students identified as being at risk. In the clinical setting candidates demonstrate communication and collaborative skills. The special education cooperating teacher or the principal will evaluate the candidate at the end of the internship experience and candidates will be observed and evaluated by the internship instructor. This internship is completed in conjunction with SEDU 374, Curriculum and Methods for Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SEDU 402 Clinical Practice Seminar in Special Education (2)

Candidates engaged in clinical practice in special education meet for bi-weekly seminar meetings. During these meetings, candidates discuss their clinical experience, examine classroom challenges, and discuss their roles and responsibilities as professionals in the field of special education. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Clinical Practice

SEDU 401 Clinical Practice in Special Education (10)

In this course, candidates will be involved in a full-time guided experience in a special education classroom with students with disabilities. This course offers candidates the opportunity to apply in diverse settings, the knowledge and skills gained through the program’s coursework and internship. Candidates will provide direct instruction to students individually, in small groups, as a whole class in inclusive and special education classrooms. Candidates will be encouraged to use diagnostic prescriptive teaching and multi-sensory instruction based upon specific needs of students across skill domains (academic, social, physical, behavioral, functional). Within this clinical setting, candidates will demonstrate the ability to interpret information from formal and informal assessment procedures, develop assessment strategies for instruction and create varied opportunities for all students to participate using effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Clinical Practice